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20131028
20131105
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KPIX (CBS) 6
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
michael hayden who ran the national security agency when some of our allies phones were attacked. we'll get analysis from david ignatious of the "washington post," david sanger of the "new york times." cbs news chief legal correspondent jan crawford and cbs news political director john dickerson. as we approach the 50th anniversary of the kennedy assassination we'll talk to former "life" magazine editor dick stolen and granddaughter of abe da bra ma'am zaputa it's a lot but that's what we do at "face the nation." >> schieffer: good morning again we welcome to the broadcast the chairman of the senate intelligence committee california senator diane feinstein. thank you so much, senator, for coming. you have been a big defender from the beginning of the national security agency but you were clearly upset with the revelation that we were tapping german chancellor angla merkel's cell phone, you said it was a big problem that the empty was unaware. do you believe that that the president didn't know this was happening? >> i can't answer that. i don't know. but i think where allies are
the national security agency and spying on foreign allied leaders has been embarrassing for the obama administration at a time when it hardly needs more bad news. is it more than an embarrassment? should it raise alarms abroad and at home? at first glance this is a story that is less about ethics and more about power. the great power gap between the united states and other countries, even rich european ones. the most illuminating response came from the former foreign minister of france. he said in a radio interview, let's be honest. we eavesdrop, too. everyone is listening to everyone else. he went on to add, "we don't have the same means as the united states which makes us jealous." america spends tens of billions of dollars on intelligence collection. it's hard to get data to make good comparisons but it is safe to assume that washington's intelligence budget dwarfs that of other countries just as it does with defense spending. it is particularly strange that this rift should develop between the united states and its closest allies in europe. it was predictable and in fact in a sens
, the problem is we're not getting the full story out of the national security agency. if they had been simply running through spanish calls looking for particular terrorists over the course of a month, 60 million called is no big deal. it's almost acceptable. i think the shock for most people is that the united states allowed this to be leaked out in documented. that's what the french and germans and spanish are reacting to. now as for listening, to heads of state, that's something else. and frankly it would be highly unusual for the national security agency to monitor the chancellor of germany's phone and not tell the president early on. that would be completely opposite standard operating procedure. >> and that's what the "the wall street journal" is saying this morning citing several sources that the president wasn't notified of this. you have called this the worst damage to u.s. intelligence in 30 or 40 years. with a it worth it? >> absolutely not. look, the national security agency, i depended upon it for my entire career. it's got brilliant information when it comes to counterterrorism.
or democrat. people are more dependent now. >>> a new report says the national security agency is monitoring e-mails and other information on google and yahoo. the "washington post" says the agency tapped into cables around the world. that is according to secret documents from nsa leaker edward snowden. the nsa is rejecting allegations that it spied on the vatican. officials say the story from an italian magazine are not true. >>> the boston red sox are world champions once again. they beat the st. louis cardinals last night 6-1. it is boston's world series win. mark strassmann is inside fenway park. >> good morning, charlie. what a night here in fenway park as inning by inning pitch by pitch the crowd in here stood up and got louder waiting for the magical moment. >> the red sox are world champions! >> bedlam boston the final pitch with koji uehara thousands of fans poured into the streets to celebrate the historic championship. it is the first time in 95 years the red sox have won the world series in fenway park. david ortiz was the series mvp. >> thi
claims that might lead to more financial settlements. >> former national security agency contractors edward snowden leaked documents that the u.s. eavesdropped on mang ello and others. >> the president feels strongly that we should collect information -- should not collect information on people just because we can, but because we should. >> a suspect, deandre weans, the alleged trigger man. witnesses said all three talked about the murder and wean said, quote, the guy should not have tried to play the hero. >> depend ability ranking find that cause made like toyota and alexus, the most reliable. in the large up scale, the lexus takes the top spot and the legacy the top side and the honda fit is the best sub compact. >> okay. good live -- little list there. none of our cars are there. >> and better connection for those with disabilities. >> this is after a man died after an altercation back in january. deborah debra alfarone was the only media there. >> the meeting you are about to see seems like any other meeting, but it is historic and it is taking place right here in maryland. >> w
the national security agency spying scandal, for want of a better word. all this news that the u.s. conducted surveillance on our own allies. some of the documents posted by or leaked by edward snowden to the media indicate that these programs started in 2002. why spy on an ally? >> jake, if there were such a program, it would be classified and i couldn't talk about it. it would be totally inappropriate, and i haven't been in the loop now obviously for more than four years. so it's just one of those subjects i couldn't discuss. >> without getting specific, on a theoretical basis, what is the interest of the united states in conducting surveillance on a country who is a clear ally of the united states? >> i've got to go with the answer i have given you. let me say this. we do have a fantastic intelligence capability worldwide against all kinds of potential issues and concerns. we are vulnerable, as was shown on 9/11, and you never know what you're going to need when you need it. the fact is, we do collect a lot of intelligence and without speaking about any particular target or group of target
been targets of the national security agency. the "washington post" reports the nsa broke into those centers and retrieved millions of communication records from the companies. an italian magazine says the nsa recorded vatican phone calls when cardinals were gathering to elect a new pope. general keith alexander director of the nsa says the latest allegations are false. >> this is not nsa breaking into any databases. it would be illegal for us to do that. and so i don't know what the report is, but i can tell you factually we do not have access to google servers, yahoo servers. >> the "washington post" story was based on documents obtained from nsa leaker edward snowden. >>> 5:38 now. cabinet secretary kathleen sebelius has spent the past week defending that troubled rollout of the healthcare reform program. as susan mcginnis reports from capitol hill, things got tougher when she had to answer questions from a congressional committee. >>> reporter: health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius is promising to fix the government's troubled healthcare website. >> so let me say
around the world will be making their own decisions. the director of the national security agency has been before a congressional committee this week taking direct questions about how his department collects intelligence. >> journalists who published snowden's leaked documents told cnn he does not believe general keith alexander when he insists the nsa is following rules. >> he's being very specific and talking particularly about the reports of earlier this week, tens of millions of phone calls in france and spain, and he said it's completely false. what is your reaction to that? >> notice what he did not off, any evidence for the truth of what he's saying this is, remember, an agency that is extremely beleaguered in the middle of an intense scandal, both at home and abroad. it is an agency whose top officials have a record of lying to the congress and to the american people through the media, including general alexander. and these claims, which i was astonished to watch journalists yesterday go on television and treat as though they were the gospel are accusations made without eviden
spying extends to some of the closest allies abroad. the national security agency end ad program that spied on as many as 35 world leaders after the white house order an internal review over the summer. several programs have already been shut down and others are expected to be closed at a later date. the report states president obama spent nearly five years in office in the dark, unaware of the nsa's practices overseas. officials say the targets of these programs are not typically decided by the president, but by the agency. yesterday congressman peter king defended the nsa's program saying they should be viewed as a positive thing for everyone involved. >> i think the president should stop apologizing, stop being defensive. the reality is the nsa has saved thousands of lives not just in the u.p.s. but france and germany and throughout europe. we're trying to gatherable against that helps us and helps the europeans. >> there are reports that the president did know that angela merkel's cell phone was being tapped. >> talk about a confounding story in terms of not understanding the
say this morning the president did not know until this sum they're the national security agency was reportedly monitoring up to 35 foreign leaders. european union officials are in washington to meet with white house aides and congressional leaders today. the europeans say they want guarantees of no more american surveillance. >>> american officials who survived last year's attack in benghazi and libya tell "60 minutes" they knew for months an assault was coming. the attack killed ambassador chris stephens and three other americans. lara logan spent the full year reporting last night's story. steven's deputy told lara on the night of the assault she was told early on no military backup would come. >> you have this conversation with the defense attache, ask him what military assets are on their way and he says -- >> effectively, they're not. and i for a moment -- i just felt lost. i just couldn't believe the answer. and then i made the call to the chief and told him, listen, you've got to tell those guys there may not be any help coming. >> that's a tough thing to understand. why?
phone calls by millions of europeans. the national security agency director alexander testified yesterday on capitol hill that european spy agencies shared those records with the u.s. >> to be perfectly clear this is not information we collected on european citizens. it represents information that we and our nato allies have collected in defense of our countries and in support of military operations. >> at another hearing, national sbel intelligence directors was asked about monitoring allies. he said american friends spy on the united states. >> some of this reminds me of the classic movie casablanca. there's gambling going on here. it's the same thing. >>> john miller is here. >> good morning. clapper used the same one i used monday. either we think a like or he's a viewer. >> which is it? >> in the name of full discloe disclosure disclosure, he was my old boss before this job. >> let's get to the point. we do it to them; they do it to us. is there something special aboutnyabout germany and chancellor merkel that makes them want to pay more attention to her? >>
of the morning. the white house is reviewing all u.s. surveillance programs after reports national security agency was spying on some 35 world leaders and the top senator on the senate intelligence committee says he is totally opposed to that surveillance and that data collection will not continue. cnn's chief national correspondent john king is here to talk more about all of this. it's pretty interesting where things have gotten with this spying controversy, john. the white house is saying they're going to review the spying policy of foreign leaders but dianne feinstein, she is not happy. she says she's been kept in the dark and wants a further review that she's going to spreer heea. >> dianne feinstein was a defender of the nsa, saying most of the intelligence gathering was necessary. but she defended most of the practices. now she's not happy. she doesn't think she's getting straight answers from the agency and sometimes the white house. she's promising tougher scrutiny. that's a signal to the administration, significantly in this latest case she put out a statement saying the administra
serious a threat is that to national security? >> this is the most serious leak, the most serious compromise of classified information in the history of the u.s. intelligence agency. >> >> miller: because of the amount of it or the type in >> the amount and the type. ♪ ♪ >> simon: the phrase "the greatest show on earth" usually refers to the circus, but man named peter gelb who runs the metropolitan opera in new york city is doing everything he can to change that. there's no other place where you can see such monumental staging, elaborate sets and a cast of hundreds. but the met is above all about extraordinary voices, some of the best voices in the world. tonight we're going to take you backstage at the met and show it to you in a way you've never seen it before. >> i'm steve kroft. >> i'm lesley stahl. >> i'm morley safer. >> i'm bob simon. >> i'm lara logan. >> i'm scott pelley. those stories tonight on "60 minutes." >> cbs money watch update sponsored by: >> glor: good evening. the fed meets this week and is expected to maintain its current bond-buying program, currently $
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)